Take control of your Equifax® credit report

Access free tools and resources to help better protect yourself from identity theft and fraud, and stay informed about what's in your credit report.

Freeze your Equifax credit report for free

A security freeze can help prevent unauthorized access to your Equifax credit report by making it unavailable to open new credit in your name.1 You can place a security freeze on your Equifax credit report -- for free -- online, by phone, or by mail. You can also place a security freeze for a child under 16 or an incapacitated adult.

3 easy steps

Yes. Visit Customer Care to learn how to submit requests by phone or by mail.

Parents, legal guardians or others with Power of Attorney can place a security freeze on the Equifax credit reports of minors under the age of 16. You must be 18 to create a myEquifaxTM account. 

While fraud alerts and security freezes both help better protect your personal information, they do so in different ways.


With a fraud alert on your Equifax credit report, third parties such as creditors and lenders can access your credit report, but when they do, they are notified that they should take steps to verify your identity before granting new or additional credit in your name. When you place a fraud alert on your Equifax credit report, Equifax will refer your fraud alert request to Experian and TransUnion, so they can place the same alert on your credit report within their organizations.

A security freeze on your credit report generally prevents access to your Equifax credit report to open new credit accounts. Unless you temporarily lift or permanently remove a freeze from your Equifax credit report, it can’t be accessed to open new accounts (subject to certain exceptions). See more about exceptions. To freeze your other credit reports, you can contact Experian and TransUnion.

To place a security freeze on the Equifax credit report of a minor (under the age of 16), download and follow the instructions on the Minor Freeze Request form.
To place a security freeze on the Equifax credit report of an incapacitated adult, download and follow the instructions on the Incapacitated Adult Freeze Request form.

In order to add a security freeze to the Experian or TransUnion credit reports of an incapacitated adult or a minor, you will need to contact those bureaus directly.

Experian: www.experian.com
TransUnion: www.transunion.com

Place a free fraud alert or active duty alert

A fraud alert, which is free, is an alert on your credit report that lets lenders know you may be a victim of fraud, so they can take extra steps to verify your identity. You can place a
1-year initial fraud alert or active duty alert online, by phone, or by mail. To request a 7-year extended fraud alert, download the Extended Fraud Alert Request form — you’ll need to send documentation showing you’re a victim of identity theft. Fraud alerts can also be placed on behalf of incapacitated adults.

3 easy steps

Yes. Visit Customer Care to learn how to submit requests by phone or mail. You must be 18 to create a myEquifaxTM account.

Please note: In order to place a fraud alert, you will need to have an active Equifax credit report on file.

A fraud alert is a notice on your credit report that alerts creditors you are or may be a victim of fraud, including identity theft. A fraud alert can make it harder for someone to open unauthorized accounts in your name. It encourages lenders and creditors to take extra steps to verify your identity, such as contacting you by phone, before opening a new credit account in your name or making changes to existing accounts.

There are two types of fraud alerts you can place on your credit report, and both are free.

  • Initial fraud alert - If you believe you are or may become a victim of fraud or identity theft, you may place an initial fraud alert on your credit report. An initial fraud alert remains on your credit report for one year, unless you choose to remove it sooner, and can be renewed for additional one-year periods. An initial fraud alert also allows you to request an additional free copy of your credit reports from the three nationwide credit bureaus during the 12-month period following the placement of the initial fraud alert.
  • Extended fraud alert - If you have a police report showing you’re a victim of identity theft, you may place an extended fraud alert on your credit report. An extended fraud alert remains on your credit report for seven years unless you choose to remove it sooner. An extended fraud alert also allows you to request two free credit reports from the three nationwide credit bureaus during the 12-month period following the placement of the extended fraud alert, and your name is removed from pre-screened credit card or insurance offers for 5 years.

You can contact any of the three nationwide credit bureaus to request a fraud alert. Once you have you placed a fraud alert on your credit report with one of the bureaus, that bureau will send a request to the other two bureaus to do the same, so you do not have to contact all three.

To place an initial one-year fraud alert, create or sign in to a myEquifax account, or call our automated line at 800-685-1111. You can also place an initial fraud alert by mail by downloading and following the instructions on the Alert Request form.

To place an extended seven-year fraud alert, download and follow the instructions on the Extended Fraud Alert Request form. You’ll need to include additional documentation showing you’re a victim of identity theft.


Visit our FAQs to find out What is the difference between fraud alerts and security freezes?

An active duty alert is available for service members on active military duty who want to help minimize their risk of fraud or identity theft while deployed. An active duty alert is similar to initial fraud alerts; they can make it harder for someone to open unauthorized accounts in your name. It encourages lenders and creditors to take extra steps to verify your identity, such as contacting you by phone, before taking certain actions, such as opening a new credit account in your name or increasing your credit limit.

An active duty alert is free and lasts for one year, and your name is removed from pre-screened credit card or insurance offers for two years.

You can contact any of the three nationwide credit bureaus to request an active duty alert. Once you have placed an active duty alert on your credit report with one of the bureaus, that bureau will send a request to the other two bureaus to do the same, so you do not have to contact all three.

To place an active duty alert, create or sign in to a myEquifax account, or call our automated line at 800-685-1111. You can also place an active duty alert by mail by downloading and following the instructions on the Alert Request Form.

Opt out of pre-screened offers

Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), Equifax is permitted to include your name on lists used by creditors or insurers to make firm offers of credit or insurance that are not initiated by you. If you prefer not to receive such offers,  visit www.optoutprescreen.com, or call toll free at 1-888-5-OPT OUT (888–567–8688)

Submit a dispute

If you see information on your Equifax credit report that you believe is inaccurate or incomplete, file a dispute, and we'll look into it. If we find that information on your credit report needs to be updated, we’ll take care of it.

Get your free annual credit report

Get a free copy of your credit report every 12 months to ensure that the information on all of your credit reports is correct and up to date. Visit www.annualcreditreport.com to get started.

Other ways to get additional free credit reports

You may be entitled to additional free credit reports in certain circumstances, such as after placing a fraud alert, becoming unemployed or receiving public assistance, or being denied credit or insurance in the past 60 days.

  1. Placing a security freeze on your Equifax credit report will prevent access to it by certain third parties. Freezing your Equifax credit report will not prevent access to your credit report at any other credit reporting agency. Entities that may still have access to your Equifax credit report include: companies like Equifax Global Consumer Solutions, which provide you with access to your credit report or credit score, or monitor your credit report as part of a subscription or similar service; companies that provide you with a copy of your credit report or credit score, upon your request; federal, state and local government agencies and courts in certain circumstances; companies using the information in connection with the underwriting of insurance, or for employment, tenant or background screening purposes; companies that have a current account or relationship with you, and collection agencies acting on behalf of those whom you owe; companies that authenticate a consumer's identity for purposes other than granting credit, or for investigating or preventing actual or potential fraud; and companies that wish to make pre-approved offers of credit or insurance to you. To opt out of such pre-approved offers, visit www.optoutprescreen.com.