Why should I check my credit report?
  • The more you know about your credit history before making a big decision, like buying a house or a car, the more prepared you will be to take on the financial obligations that may happen as a result.
  • Checking your credit reports does not impact your credit scores, but it may help establish the right kinds of behaviors early on, and may help spot signs of identity theft.
How can I get a free credit report?
Here are some of the ways to get a free copy of your Equifax credit report.
  • myEquifax

    As part of myEquifax, you'll receive two Equifax credit reports per year. It's free!

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  • Annualcreditreport.com

    You are entitled to free credit reports from each of the nationwide credit bureaus each year.

    Get started
  • Equifax.com/FCRA

    You may be entitled to additional free credit reports under certain circumstances.

    Get started

What you need to know

Ever wondered what information goes into your credit report, and what to look for as you’re reviewing it? A credit report is a summary of your unique financial history. The three nationwide credit bureaus collect and maintain a history of your credit activity as reported by the lenders and creditors you have accounts with. Your credit report includes important information about you, including:

  • Personal information, such as your name, Social Security number, aliases or former names, current and former addresses, and sometimes your current and former employers;
  • Account information, including payment history, account balances and limits, and dates the accounts were opened or closed. This includes credit accounts that may be in your name such as credit cards, mortgages, student loans, and vehicle loans;
  • Bankruptcies and accounts in collections; and
  • Inquiries, which lists the lenders and other companies that have accessed your credit report.


As you look at your credit report, keep the following in mind:

  • In the personal information section of your credit report, is your name listed accurately, and your address up to date?
  • In the account information portion of your credit report, are the accounts listed complete and accurate?
  • If any of the information is inaccurate or incomplete, it is important to contact the lender or creditor that issued the account, or the nationwide credit bureau that issued the credit report.

Your credit reports tell a detailed story about you, including information about your financial accounts, and your payment history. Those who can access this information, including third parties with “permissible purpose”, may accept or deny your applications for credit based in part on the information in your credit reports, as well as their own lending criteria.

The more you know about your financial accounts and credit history before making a big decision like buying a house or a car, the more prepared you will be to take on the financial obligations that may happen as a result.

Another way you can receive a copy of your free credit report from the three major credit bureaus is by meeting one of the following requirements as outlined in the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

If you meet one of these requirements, you are entitled to one additional free copy of your credit report during any 12-month period:

  • You're unemployed and intend to apply for employment within 60 days
  • You're receiving public welfare assistance
  • You believe your credit report contains inaccurate information due to fraud


You are also entitled to a free copy of your credit report if you meet these requirements:

  • You've been denied credit or insurance within the past 60 days
  • You've placed a fraud alert on your credit reports

If you live in certain states, you may be eligible for additional free credit reports.

More about credit reports